The Gene and Linda Voiland School of

Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering

Nehal Abu-Lail, Ph.D.
Linda Voiland Professor

Research Focus: Multiscale Cellular Interactions and Properties

The Gene and Linda Voiland
School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering
1505 Stadium Way, Room 105
P.O. Box 646515
Washington State University
Pullman, WA 99164-6515

Office: 313 Wegner Hall (Tel: 509-335-4961)
Lab: Wegner 361, 365 and 370 (Tel: 509-335-0451)
nehal@wsu.edu

Graduate Students

Mahmoud Amr
Alia Mallah
Somayeh Ramezanian
Samuel Uzoechi

Alumni Students

Baran Arslan
Nahawand El-Zinati
Asma Eskhan
Pinar Gordesli
Bong-Jae Park
Chrystal Quisenberry

Biographical Information

Dr. Nehal Abu-Lail’s Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D., Chemical Engineering - Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA [Thesis title: The effect of biopolymer properties on bacterial adhesion: an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study.] - 2004
  • M.S., Chemical Engineering - Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid Jordan [Thesis title: Characterization and treatment of olive oil mills effluent wastewater.] - 1998
  • B.S., Chemical Engineering - Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid Jordan - 1996

Awards/Honors Received

  • 2016 - Chemical engineering teacher of the year
  • 2016 - VCEA college nominee for the featured faculty program at WSU
  • 2015 - GPSA Award of Excellence for advising
  • 2014 - Martin Luther King distinguished service award for the faculty category/WSU
  • 2013 - Reid Miller College of Engineering Teacher of the Year
  • 2013 - Bioengineering teacher of the year
  • 2013 - Fulbright scholar
  • 2013 - NIH Early Career Reviewer
  • 2013 - 3M grantee for untenured faculty
  • 2011 - Participated in the National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Education symposium
  • 2010 - Nominated for American Chemical Society Unilever award for outstanding young investigator in colloid and surfactant science
  • 2008 - Nominated for the American Chemical Society Victor K. LaMer award for graduate research in colloid and surface chemistry
  • 2007 - Office of Naval Research travel grant to present a paper at the 54th American Vacuum Society annual meeting held in Seattle, WA
  • 2005 - Duke University travel award to present a poster at the first international symposium on biointerface science held in New Bern, NC
  • 2004 - Sigma Xi PhD Research Award/ WPI for excellence in Ph.D. dissertation
  • 2004 - The American Institute of Chemists Award for outstanding Ph.D. thesis, New England
  • 2003 - WPI graduate student organization travel award to present a paper at the 103rd American Society for Microbiology meeting held in Washington, DC
  • 2002 - WPI graduate student organization travel award to present a paper at the 223rd American Chemical Society national meeting held in Orlando, Florida
  • 2002 - The Colloids and Surface Science Division award for best poster in the 223rd American Chemical Society national meeting held in Orlando, Florida
  • 2000–2001 - Roberts S. Park Graduate Fellowship, WPI, Worcester, MA
  • 2000–2001 - WPI prestigious Graduate Fellowship, Worcester, MA
  • 1996–1998 - Jordan University of Science and Technology graduate M.S. fellowship, Irbid, Jordan
  • 1991–1996 - Academic honors with distinction, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan

Professional Experience

  • Visiting Professor & Fulbrightor - Chemical Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology - 2013–2014
  • Associate Professor - Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering & Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA - 2012–present
  • Assistant Professor - Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering & Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA - 2006–2012
  • Post-doctoral Fellow - Center for Biologically Inspired Materials & Material Systems, Duke University, Durham, NC - 2003–2006
  • Teaching Assistant - Chemical Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA - 2002–2003
  • Graduate Research Assistant - Chemical Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA - 2000–2002
  • Lecturer - Chemical Engineering, AL-Balq’a University, Irbid Jordan - 1999–2000
  • Chemistry Teacher - Dar Al-Oloum High School, Irbid Jordan - 1998–1999
  • Teaching Assistant - Chemical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid Jordan - 1996–1998
  • Engineer - Jordan Petroleum Refinery, Al-Zarqa’ Jordan - 1995

Specific Research Projects

The following research projects are currently being investigated in the lab:

  1. Fundamental Mechanisms of L. monocytogenes Adhesion and Virulence
  2. The Design of Wettability and Charge of Antifouling Oceanic Materials on the Basis of Molecular Properties of Marine Fouling Bacteria
  3. Development of Current Bacterial Adhesion Models
  4. Investigate the Relationship between Micro-scale and Macro-scale Bacterial Adhesion
  5. Friction and Bacteria
  6. Design Sensors and Actuators to Detect Pathogens
  7. Nanomechanics of Mammalian Cells

Board Memberships

I am on the editorial board for Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (2009), Journal of Biosensors & Bioelectronics (2010), Journal of Bioengineering and Biomedical Science (2010) and Austin Journal of Biomedical Engineering (2013).

Membership in Professional Organizations


I am a member in these organizations:

  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
  • Materials Research Society
  • Biophysical Society
  • American Institute of Chemists
  • American Society for Microbiology
  • American Institute of Chemical Engineers
  • American Chemical Society
  • American Society for Engineering Education
  • Jordan Engineering Society

Selected Publications

  1. Baran Arslan, Mert Colpan, Xiaohui Ju, Xiao Zhang, Alla Kostyukova and Nehal I. Abu-Lail. “The effects of noncellulosic compounds on the nanoscale interaction forces measured between carbohydrate-binding module and lignocellulosic biomass,Biomacromolecules (IF: 5.75), 2016, 17 (5), 1705–1715; doi: 10.1021/acs.biomac.6b00129.
  2. Chrystal Quisenberry, Arshan Nazempour, Bernard Van Wie, and Nehal I. Abu-Lail. “β1-integrin expression on chondrogenically differentiating human adipose-derived stem cells using atomic force microscopy.Biointerphases (IF: 3.374), 11, 021005 (2016); doi: 10.1116/1.4947049
  3. Arshan Nazempour, Chrystal Quisenberry, Bernard Van Wie, and Nehal I. Abu-Lail. “Mechanics of engineered cartilage tissues from human adipose stem cells: Synergistic influences of TGF-β3 and oscillating pressure.Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (IF: 1.55), Vol. 16, 1-10, 2016. doi:10.1166/jnn.2016.12564.
  4. Chrystal R. Quisenberry, Arshan Nazempour, Bernard J. Van Wie and Nehal I. Abu-Lail. “Expression of N-cadherin on chondrogenically differentiating human adipose-derived stem cells using single-molecule force spectroscopy.Journal of Nanomedicine Research (Open Access), 3(1), 00045, 2016. doi: 10.15406/jnmr.2016.03.00045.
  5. Waled Suliman, James B Harsh, Nehal I Abu-Lail, Ann-Marie Fortuna, Ian Dallmeyer, and Manuel Garcia Perez. “Modification of biochar surface by air oxidation: Role of pyrolysis temperature.Biomass and Bioenergy (IF: 3.394), 85, 1-11, 2015, doi: 10.1016/j.biombioe.2015.11.030.
  6. Baran Arslan, Xiaohui Ju, Xiao Zhang and Nehal I. Abu-Lail. “Heterogeneity and specificity of nanoscale adhesion forces measured between self-assembled monolayers and lignocellulosic substrates: A chemical force microscopy study.Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2015 Sep 22; 31(37):10233-10245. doi: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02633.
  7. Waled Suliman, James B Harsh, Nehal I Abu-Lail, Ann-Marie Fortuna, Ian Dallmeyer, and Manuel Garcia Perez. “Influence of feedstock source and pyrolysis temperature on biochar bulk and surface properties.Biomass and Bioenergy (IF: 3.394), 84, 37-48. 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.biombioe.2015.11.010.
  8. Abdul Lone, Erhan Atci, Ryan Renslow, Haluk Beyenal, Susan Noh, Boel Fransson, Nehal Abu-Lail, Jeong-Jin Park, David Gang, and Douglas Call. “Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins.Infection and Immunity (IF: 3.731), May, 2015, 83(8):3026-34. doi:10.1128/IAI.00175-15.
  9. Mia Kiamco, Erhan Atci, Qaiser Farid, Abdelrhman Mohamed, Ryan Renslow, Nehal I. Abu-Lail, Boel Fransson, D. Call and Haluk Beyenal. “Vancomycin and maltodextrin act synergistically against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms by affecting structure and activity.Biotechnology & Bioengineering, 2015, 112(12), 2562-2570 (IF: 4.164), doi: 10.1002/bit.25681.
  10. Abdul Lone, Erhan Atci, Ryan Renslow, Haluk Beyenal, Susan Noh, Boel Fransson, Nehal Abu-Lail, Jeong-Jin Park, David Gang, and Douglas Call. “Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants.Infection and Immunity (IF: 3.731), Feb., 2015, 83(6):2531-41. doi: 10.1128/IAI.03075-14.
  11. B.-J. Park, F. P. Gordesli, and N. I. Abu-Lail. “The role of pH conditions of growth in the specificity of interaction forces measured between pathogenic L. monocytogenes and silicon nitride.Journal of Bionanoscience (Open Access), 2014, 8, 1-12. doi: 10.1166/jbns.2014.1266
  12. I. Al-Hamarneh, P. Pedrow, A. Eskhan, and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Synthesis and characterization of di(ethylene glycol) vinyl ether deposited by atmospheric pressure weakly ionized corona streamer plasma.Surface & Coatings Technology (IF: 1.998), 2013, 234, 33–41, doi: 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2013.06.112.
  13. Brown, E.; Dehong, H.; Abu-Lail, N. I.; Zhang, X. “Synthesis and analysis of the molecular interactions of nanocrystalline cellulose-fibrin nanocomposites for artificial vascular graft applications.Biomacromolecules (IF: 5.75), 2013, 14(4):1063-1071, doi: 10.1021/bm3019467.
  14. A. Eskhan & N. I. Abu-Lail. “A comparison between Poisson statistical approach and a new method in decoupling the adhesion energies of L. monocytogenes EGDe into specific and nonspecific components.Colloid and Polymer Science (IF: 2.41), 292(2): 343-353, 2013, doi:10.1007/s00396-013-3017-7.
  15. L. H. Kawas, C. C. Benoist, J. W. Harding, G. A. Wayman and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Nanoscale mapping of the Met receptor on hippocampal neurons by AFM and confocal microscopy.” Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (IF: 6.155), 2013, 9(3), 428-438. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2012.08.008.
  16. A. Eskhan & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes lineages’ I and II environmental and epidemic strains.Journal of Colloids and Interface Science (IF: 3.368), 394, 554–563, 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2012.11.038.
  17. I. Al-Hamarneh, P. Pedrow, A. Eskhan, and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Hydrophilic property of 316L stainless steel after treatment by atmospheric pressure corona streamer plasma using surface-sensitive analyses.Applied Surface Science (IF: 2.711), 2012, 259, 424-432. doi: 10.1016/j.apsusc.2012.07.061.
  18. F. P. Gordesli and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Combined Poisson and soft-particle DLVO Analysis of L. monocytogenes nanoscale adhesion forces at varying temperatures of growth.Environmental Science and Technology (IF: 5.330), 2012, 46(18), 10089-10098. doi: 10.1021/es300653w.
  19. F. P. Gordesli and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Impact of ionic strength of growth on the physiochemical properties, structure and adhesion of L. monocytogenes polyelectrolyte brushes to a silicon nitride surface in water.Journal of Colloids and Interface Science (IF: 3.368), 2012, 388, 257-267. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2012.08.048.
  20. Fatma Pinar Gordesli & N. I. Abu-Lail. “The role of thermal stresses on the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to silicon nitride: An atomic force microscopy study.Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2012, 28 (2), 1360–1373. doi: 10.1021/la203639k.
  21. B.-J. Park & N. I. Abu-Lail. “The role of the pH conditions of growth on the bioadhesion of individual and lawns of pathogenic L. monocytogenes cells.Journal of Colloids and Interface Science (IF: 3.368), 2011, 358, 611-620. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.03.025.
  22. B.-J. Park & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Heterogeneities in the adhesion energies measured between Listeria pathogenic and non-pathogenic species and silicon nitride probed using atomic force microscopy.Biofouling (IF: 3.415), 2011, 27(5), 543-559. doi: 10.1080/08927014.2011.584129.
  23. B.-J. Park & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Variations in the nanomechanical properties of virulent and avirulent Listeria monocytogenes.Soft Matter (IF: 4.029), 2010, 6, 3898-3909. doi: 10.1039/b927260g.
  24. B.-J. Park, T. Haines & N. I. Abu-Lail. “A Correlation between the virulence and the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to silicon nitride: An AFM study.Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (IF: 4.152), 2009, 73 (2), 237-243. doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2009.05.027.
  25. D. Chang, N. I. Abu-Lail, J. Coles, F. Guilak, G. Jay & S. Zauscher. “Friction force microscopy of lubricin and hyaluronic acid between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces.Soft Matter (IF: 4.029), 2009, 5(18), 3438-3445. doi: 10.1039/b907155e.
  26. D. Chang, N. I. Abu-Lail, F. Guilak, G. Jay & S. Zauscher. “Conformational mechanics, adsorption and normal force interactions of lubricin and hyaluronic acid on model surfaces.Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2008, 24(4), 1183-1193. doi: 10.1021/la702366t.
  27. Alexei Valiaev, N. I. Abu-Lail, D.-W. Lim, A. Chilkoti & S. Zauscher. “Microcantilever sensing and actuation with end-grafted stimulus-responsive elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs).Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2007, 23, 339-344. doi: 10.1021/la0616698.
  28. David M. Loveless, N. I. Abu-Lail, Marian Kaholek, S. Zauscher & Stephen L. Craig. “Reversibly cross-linked surface grafted polymer brushes.Angewandte Chemie-International Edition (IF: 11.261), 2006, 45(46), 7812-7814. doi: 10.1002/anie.200602508.
  29. Yee Lam, N. I. Abu-Lail, Munir Alam & S. Zauscher. “Using microcantilever deflection to detect HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine (IF: 6.155), 2006, 2(4), 222-229. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2006.10.002.
  30. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “The effect of solvent polarity on the molecular surface properties and adhesion of E. coli.Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (IF: 3.456), 2006, 51, 62-70. doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2006.05.009.
  31. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “Specific and nonspecific interaction forces between E. coli and silicon nitride, determined by Poisson statistical analysis.Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2006, 22, 7296-7301. doi: 10.1021/la0533415
  32. N. I. Abu-Lail, M. Kaholek, B. LaMattina, R. L. Clark & S. Zauscher. “Microcantilevers with end grafted stimulus-responsive polymer brushes for actuation and sensing.Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical (IF: 4.097), 2006, 114(1), 371-378. doi: 10.1016/j.snb.2005.06.003.
  33. N. I. Abu-Lail, T. Ohashi, R. Clark, H. Erickson & S. Zauscher. “Understanding the elasticity of fibronectin fibrils: Unfolding strengths of FN-III and GFP domains measured by single molecule force spectroscopy.Matrix Biology (IF: 5.074), 2006, 25, 175-184. doi: 10.1016/j.matbio.2005.10.007.
  34. M. Azzam, K. Al-Malah & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Olive mills effluent (OME) wastewater post-treatment using activated carbon.Journal of Environmental Science and Health –Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering (IF: 1.164), 2004, A39(1), 268-280. doi: 10.1016/S1383-5866(00)00114-3.
  35. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “The role of lipopolysaccharides in the adhesion, retention, and transport of E. coli JM109.Environmental Science and Technology (IF: 5.330), 2003, 37(10), 2173-2183. doi: 10.1021/es026159o.
  36. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “Role of ionic strength on the relationship of biopolymer conformation, DLVO contributions and steric interactions to bioadhesion of P. putida kT2442.Biomacromolecules (IF: 5.75), 2003, 4, 1000-1012. doi: 10.1021/bm034055f.
  37. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “Elasticity of P. putida KT2442 surface polymers probed with single- molecule force spectroscopy.Langmuir (IF: 4.457), 2002, 18, 4071-4081. doi: 10.1021/la015695b.
  38. T. A. Camesano & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Heterogeneity in bacterial surface polysaccharides, probed on a single-molecule basis.Biomacromolecules (IF: 5.75), 2002, 3, 661-667. doi: 10.1021/bm015648y.
  39. K. Al- Malah, M. Azzam & N. I. Abu-Lail. “Olive mills effluent wastewater post-treatment using activated clay.Separation and Purification Technology (IF: 3.091), 2000, 20 (2-3), 225-234. doi: 10.1016/S1383-5866(00)00114-3.

Peer-reviewed book chapters and review articles

  1. Arslan, B. and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Applications of Atomic Force Microscopy for Cellulosic Materials.” Invited review, 2013, Atomic force microscopy (AFM): Principles, modes of operation and limitations by Nova Publications.
  2. C. Quisenberry and N. I. Abu-Lail. “Atomic force microscopy investigations of articular cartilage.” Invited review, 2013, Atomic force microscopy (AFM): Principles, modes of operation and limitations by Nova Publications.
  3. N. I. Abu-Lail and H. Beyenal. “Characterization of bacteria-biomaterial interactions, from a single cell to biofilms.” An invited-peer reviewed book chapter in “Characterization of Biomaterials”, edited by Amit Bandyopadhyay and Susmita Bose, Elsevier, Oxford, UK, 2012.
  4. N. I. Abu-Lail. “An AFM look at the molecular world of bacteria.” An invited peer-reviewed book chapter in “Microbial Surfaces: Structure, Interactions, and Reactivity”, edited by Terri Camesano & Charlene Mellow, American Chemical Society Publications, Washington, DC. Symposium Series 984, 2007. 100% my effort at WSU.
  5. N. I. Abu-Lail & T. A. Camesano. “AFM and SMFM studies of biopolymers, invited review.” Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Technology, Dekker Inc. 2004, 119-131.
  6. N. I. Abu-Lail & T.A. Camesano, T.A. “Polysaccharide properties probed with AFM, invited review.” Journal of Microscopy-Oxford (IF 1.782), 2003, vol. 212, Pt3, 217-238. PMID: 14629548.

Teaching

  • Transport Phenomena (ChE 310, undergraduate, 3 credits) This is a required course from both bioengineering and chemical engineering students in our program. The course introduces students to the dynamics of mass, heat and momentum transport.
  • Current Topics in Bionanotechnology (BE 481, ChE 476, undergraduate, 3 credits elective course) tailored for bioengineering and chemical engineering seniors.
    The course introduces students to current topics in bionanotechnology and their applications in the biomedical field. Example topics include nanoparticles properties, synthesis, modification, assembly, stability and characterization, and nanomedicine.
  • Introduction to Cellular Bioengineering (BE 350, 3 credits), core course for juniors in Bioengineering. The course materials cover a wide range of how engineering principles apply to cell biology (thermodynamics, kinetics, transport, mechanics, adhesion, and circuits of the cell). The course also covers new technologies and hot research areas in cellular bioengineering (tissue engineering, stem cells, genetic engineering, implants, and biosensors).
  • Cellular Bioengineering (BE 550, 3 credits), graduate core course for bioengineering. This course applies engineering principles to cell biology with a large emphasis on improving students’ oral and written communication skills and modeling skills as well.
  • Innovations in Engineering (Eng 120, 2 credits lab course), an introductory course for freshmen engineering students. I designed a one week new bioengineering modulus and implemented that for the first time, as a hands-on experiment. The module introduced students in all 8 sections to bioengineering through investigations of the role played by material type, size, and concentration on bacterial adhesion.
  • Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (ChE 476, 3 credits), a chemical engineering elective for chemical engineering and bioengineering seniors. Topics covered in this course include single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques, quantum dots, implants, artificial organs, and variable biosensors.
  • Unifed Systems Bioengineering I (BE 340, 4 credits, 3 lectures and a computer lab), a core bioengineering course for juniors. In this course, different processes in the human body are modeled using a set of differential equations (ODE’s). In the lectures’ portion of the course, students solve these ODE’s analytically and in the lab associated with the course, students solve the ODE’s numerically.

Funding

Active Research Awards

  1. NSF- Women’s engineering participation in the US: What can the US learn from women’s decisions to pursue engineering in diverse predominantly Muslim settings? Julie Kmec and Jennifer DeBoer (PIs), and Ashley Ater Kranov, Nehal Abu-Lail and Karen Bradley (Co-PIs), ($329,613). 9/1/2016 to 8/31/2018
  2. NSF-GOALI: Enhancing cartilage tissue engineering through synergistic influence of co-Culture, mechano-chemical factors, and 3D printed scaffolds in a novel centrifugal bioreactor, Van Wie, B. (PI), Nehal Abu-Lail (co-PI), Arda Gozen, Juana Mendenhall and Vincent Idone, ($475,000). 9/1/2016 to 8/31/2019
  3. Utilization of microbial biofilms for soil improvement: Roles of biofilm-mineral interactions in geomechanical behaviors of soils. NSF ($299,072) Role: Co-Principle Investigator with Muhunthan, Balasingam. 01-01-2013 to 12-31-2016.
  4. Production of Biohydrogen and Bioethanol from Agricultural and Municipal Solid Wastes, Jordan Scientific Support Research Fund, co-PI with Fahmi Abu-Rub, M. Najeeb, S. kewan, R. Jomaa, Z. Abu-Rub, and M. Shahadeh. ($206,921). 02/16/2014 to 02/15/2017
  5. 3M, Industry, Research program on nanoscale characterization of bacterial cells ($30,000). Role: Principle Investigator 05/01/2011–04/30/2013

Past Research Awards

  1. STAC-TEC: Sustainable Technology, Alternate Chemistry-Training and Education Center, NIHES-NIH, Sub-contract from the University of Washington. Award PI is Mike Yost and WSU PI is Nehal Abu-Lail with Haluk Beyenal as a co-PI. R25 ($244,658). 02/20/2013 to 02/19/2015.
  2. DoD-DM110308, Fundamental research at the nano- and microscale to understand how biofilms interact with wounds in the presence of hyperosmotic agents ($999,999). Role: Co-Principle Investigator (Co-PI). 07/15/2012–07/14/2014
  3. NSF-1067012, CBET-Energy for Sustainability, A new approach to a deep understanding of biomass recalcitrance ($299,488). Role: Co-PI. 05/01/2010–04/30/2013
  4. NSF EAGER: Synergistic influences of oscillating pressure and growth factor on chondrogenesis in a novel centrifugal bioreactor ($182,000). Role: Co-PI. 01/01/2012–12/31/2014
  5. WSU's Advance NSF EXCELin SE external mentor faculty grant ($3,520). Role: Principle Investigator. 01/19/2011-01/18/2012
  6. BRIGE: molecular mechanisms of bacterial adhesion through surface biopolymers, $195,000, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), 8/16/2008–8/15/2011, single PI. 4.
  7. R03: molecular mechanisms of L. monocytogenes adhesion through surface biopolymers, $140,375, funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), (extramural), 6/15/2009–6/14/2011, Single PI.
  8. Procurement of analytical equipment for support of research in metals contaminated sediments, $348,000, funded by the Murdock Charitable Trust Foundation (extramural). I was a co-PI with Jeffery Ullman (PI), Haluk Beyenal, Marc Beutel, Jeremy Rentz, Michael Barber, and David Yonge. With this fund, an Agilent 7500cx (LC/GC)-ICP-MS and an Applied Biosystems 4000 QTRAPTM LC-MS/MS were purchased, and a technician salary for three years was paid.
  9. AFM upgrade with an electrochemical modulus, $23,055, funded by the Omnibus equipment process at WSU, (intramural), 8/15/2009–12/31/2009, single PI. The electrochemical modulus was added in Nov. 2009 to our existing AFM

Invited Talks

Invited presentations involving work since coming to WSU in 2006 are listed below:

  1. Nanoscale investigations of cellular interactions and properties, Texas A&M Qatar, June 2016.
  2. My journey, WSU’s summer REU brown lunch bags, 2016.
  3. My journey, WSU’s TMP mentoring program, Feb. 2015.
  4. Nanoscale investigations of cellular interactions, Department of Physics and Environmental Science, University of Idaho, November, 2014.
  5. My success story. Jordan Engineers Association, January, 2014.
  6. A journey to success. Jordan University of Science and Technology, December, 2013.
  7. Investigations of nanoscale interactions of cells with surfaces. PNNL, March, 2013.
  8. Cellular nanomechanics. School of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, WSU, Feb. 2013.
  9. Nanoscale investigations of bacterial physiochemical properties and interactions, Boeing, Jan. 2012.
  10. Nanoscale investigations of bacterial physiochemical properties and interactions. Chemical Engineering seminar series at Ohio State University, OH. Oct. 27th 2011.
  11. Nanoscale investigations of bacterial physiochemical properties and interactions. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering seminar series at University of Akron, OH. Nov. 3rd 2011.
  12. Nanoscale investigations of Listeria properties, interactions and biophysical responses to environmental stimuli, 3M Global Company, June 2011.
  13. Multiscale biophysical investigations of bacterial properties, Biological Systems Engineering seminar series, Washington State University, March 2011.
  14. The application of nanoscience to medically related problems, inspiring a new generation of scholars and scientists series, Washington State University, March 2011.
  15. Multiscale biophysical investigations of bacterial properties, 3M global company, July 2010.
  16. Nanoscale control of bioadhesion via physiochemical manipulation of surfaces. Vistakon Inc., Johnson & Johnson, May 2010.
  17. Applications of nanoscience to medically related problems, WSU Cougar Undergraduate Research Experiences (CURE) NSF program, Washington State University, May 2009 and May 2011.
  18. Mechanical properties of virulent and avirulent L. monocytogenes investigated by atomic force microscopy, American Chemical Society Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2009.
  19. Nanoscale probing of adhesion and biomechanical properties of cells, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Seminar, Washington State University, March 2009.
  20. Applications of atomic force microscopy in biology: From single-molecule force spectroscopy to cellular investigations, School of Molecular Biosciences Seminar, Washington State University, February 2009.
  21. A look at the nanoscale/microscale world of living bacteria, Center for Environmental Sediments and Aquatic Research, WSU, February 2009.
  22. A nanoscale look at the living world of microbes, inspiring a new generation of scholars and scientists series, Washington State University, November 2008.
  23. Why study bacterial adhesion? Gannon Golds Worthy Discussions, Washington State University, September 2007.
  24. Molecular look at the microscale world of bacteria, Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy retreat, March 2007.
  25. Role of ionic strength on the relationship of biopolymer conformation, DLVO contributions, and steric interactions to bio-adhesion of P. putida KT2442, Biological Systems Engineering seminar, Washington State University, December 2006.

Students Mentored

Name Project Title Funding Source
Research Assistant Professors and Visiting Researchers
N. Beyenal 1, 2 Nanoscale interactions of Listeria with mucin NSF-EXCELinSE 3
S. Aliyeva 1, 2 Characterization of PAH degrading biofilms Fulbright Scholar
M. Deliorman 1, 2 AFM characterization of chronic wounds DoD
Graduate Students
B.-J. Park 2 Nanoscal adherence & virulence of Listeria monocytogenes NIH-R03/WSU
F. P. Gordesli 1, 2 Physiochemical adaptation mechanisms of Listeria monocytogenes NSF-BRIGE
A. Eskhan 1, 2 Differences among epidemic and environmental Listeria monocytogenes NIH-R03
C. Bailey 1 AFM characterization of in vitro grown cartilage tissues NSF-EAGER
B. Arslan 1 AFM characterization of cellulosic biomass NSF
S. Ramezanian 1 Biofilm enhancement of soil mechanics NSF
S. Uzeochi Multilayered scaffolds for osteochondorogenic tissues NIH Training program
N. El-zinati Conservation of nanoscale adhesion among Listeria species JUST** TA
Undergraduate Students
Sinclair Wilson 1 Biochar treatment of wastewater in Afghanistan Capstone design project
Bryce Delgado Isolation of chondrocytes from articular cartilage Research study
Brendan Hay Biofilm growth as a function of nutrients’ media Volunteer
Kalu Okeke 2 Planktonic bacterial growth Volunteer
K. Graybeal 1, 2 Nanomechanics of sperm cells NSF-CURE 4
C. Chilibeck 1, 2 Effect of Salinity on Bioremediation of oil NSF-BRIGE/REU
Sharon Cox 1, 2 Electrophoresis of bacterial charge NSF-BRIGE
David Wyrick 2 Effect of Salinity on Bioremediation of oil NSF-BRIGE/REU
Fabiola Quiroa 1, 2 Hands-on modules for cellular bioengineering WSU-LSMP
Ala’ Abu-Lail 1, 2 Building a macroscale AFM module NSF BRIGE
Joshue Orellana 2 Building a cheap UV/Vis. Spectrophotometer module NSF BRIGE
Michael Johnson Measurements of bacterial wettability NSF BRIGE
K. Dorrance 2 Automation of AFM analysis State-funded
T. Haines 2 Optimization of marine antifouling materials Start-up money
L. Alamri 1, 2 Unfolding mechanism of listeriolysin-O NIH-R03
J. Jensen 1, 2 Designing outreach bioremediation module for high schools NSF-BRIGE
R. Fischer 1, 2 Designing outreach density modules for high schools NSF-BRIGE
M. Al-Ghusein 1, 2 Designing the bacterial adhesion module used in Eng. 120 course State-funded
I. McLean 2 DNAjig nanoscale imaging Volunteer
K. Wright 1, 2 Designing outreach viscosity module for high schools NSF-BRIGE
N. Bowls 2 Transport of L. monocytogenes in sand columns Start-up money
J. Kadinger 1, 2 Analysis of adhesion energy data for L. monocytogenes strains Start-up money
K. Anderson 2 Building ligand-receptor maps of CMet on neuronal cells Start-up money
C. Hou 1, 2 Analysis of adhesion force data for L. monocytogenes strains Start-up money
A. Goettelman 1, 2 Growth of bacterial strains under various conditions Start-up money
B. Ward 1, 2 Analysis of adhesion energy data for neuronal cells Start-up money
Trent Graham 2 Transport of L. monocytogenes in sand NSF REU
Brian Grina 2 Transport of L. monocytogenes in sand 3M
Lana Stump 1,2 Transport of L. monocytogenes in sand Start-up money
Troy Reardon 2 Matlab modeling of AFM data 3M
Steven Monda 2 Characterization of chemical surface modifications of silicon Volunteer
Brandon Graham 2 Colloidal attachments to AFM cantilevers Volunteer
Jing Li 2 Batch studies of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose NARA:SURE
Zea Kimaco 1,2 Microscopy imaging of soil biofilms Volunteer
Thu Li 1,2 Colorimetric characterization of soil biofilms NSF-REU
Abigail Smith 1,2 Cantilever modification with antibodies Auvil Fellow
Mareo Matthew Growth kinetics of Pseudomonas putida WSU-TMP
Austin Sattler 2 Bacterial transport in soli columns Volunteer
Jianing Zhou (Ling) Bacterial transport in soli columns Volunteer
Jennifer Kersh 1,2 Colorimetric determination of EPS content of P. putida and S. oneidensis NSF REU
Ashley Davie 1,2 Data analysis of AFM tissue mechanics’ measurements NSF REU
Jordan Harvey 1,2 Bacterial retention on soil mimicking substrates NSF REU
Tyler Cheung 2 Digestion and growth of cartilage NSF REU
Mohammad Alibrahim 2 Bacterial growth and transport Volunteer
Kirstin Egerton 1,2 Image analysis of lingnocellulosic materials Volunteer
Jennifer Kang 1 Design of Hands-on experiences on soil contamination for k-5 kids Boeing grant
Sam Wilson 2 Calibration of bioreactors for better heat control Volunteer
Hassan Zbib 2 Bacterial growth under stress Volunteer
Kyle Groden Bacterial biofilm formation under starvation environments Volunteer
Brian Miller Characterization of bacterial extra polymeric substances colorimetrically Volunteer
Liliana Reyes 1 Investigations of bacterial biofilms’ formation in batch bioreactors Volunteer
Ali Al-Ibrahim Biofilm formation of multi-drug resistance microbes Volunteer
High School Teachers as Researchers
Gina Hopkins1, 2 Bacterial transport in porous media, Sunnyside H.S., WA NSF-BRIGE/RET
Jonathan Grotz2 Bacterial transport in porous media, Riverside H.S., WA NSF-BRIGE/RET
Jim Gustin2 Bioremediation of oil, Orofino H.S., ID NSF-BRIGE/RET
Chris Baldus2 AFM and spectrophotometer modules, Kendrick H.S., ID NSF-BRIGE/RET
1 Women
2 Former mentee
3 Partially supported by the WSU's NSF Advance Institutional Transformation Grant (Award # 0810927).
4 Partially supported by NSF CURE (Cougar Undergraduate Research Experiences) program at WSU.
**Just: Jordan University of Science and Technology

Dr. Abu-Lail and her team

(l to r) Somayeh Ramezanian, Dr. Nehal Abu-Lail, Sam Uzoechi, and Baran Arslan

(l to r) Somayeh Ramezanian, Dr. Nehal Abu-Lail, Samuel Uzoechi, and Baran Arslan

(front, l to r) Alia Mallah, Dr. Nehal Abu-Lail, Somayeh Ramezanian, Chia-Ling Kang, Sam Uzoechi; (back, l to r) Baran Arslan, Brian Miller

(front, l to r) Alia Mallah, Dr. Nehal Abu-Lail, Somayeh Ramezanian, Chia-Ling Kang, Samuel Uzoechi; (back, l to r) Baran Arslan, Brian Miller

The Gene & Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, PO Box 646515, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-6515, 509-335-4332, Email ChEBE: chebe@wsu.edu