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The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering

Bioengineering Program

Undergraduate BE Overview

(For graduate programs, please see the Graduate Programs section of the Voiland School website.)

Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering (BSBE)

Program Educational Objectives

The Program Educational Objectives for baccalaureate degree programs in Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering define achievements of which these graduates are capable. As appropriate for their chosen career paths, within five to ten years of graduation, program graduates will be able to:

  1. engage successfully in graduate or professional education or entry-level employment
  2. perform responsibly and professionally in their chosen career paths
  3. exhibit continued growth of effective communication and collaboration skills
  4. demonstrate ongoing development of competent and innovative problem solving skills
  5. continue learning and accept increasing levels of responsibility over time

These long-term Educational Objectives will be achieved through development of our Student Outcomes in a culture of integration and engagement. The Student Outcomes lay a solid, well-rounded foundation from which to build longer-term capabilities. Systemic integration of theory and practice deepens students’ understanding and builds confidence they will need for bold innovation and lifelong learning. Frequent engagement of students with peers, faculty, and external constituencies builds their interpersonal skills, refines their understanding, and leads them to opportunities for advanced study or employment. Dedicated faculty who effectively teach, mentor, refer, and model professional behaviors prepare our graduates for the professional world.

Accreditation

The BSBE degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the ABET (http://www.abet.org).

Student Learning Outcomes for the BS Degree in the Bioengineering Program

  1. APPLICATION OF MATH/SCIENCE/ENGINEERING: Students demonstrate an ability to use foundational knowledge in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, physiology, and engineering sciences.
  2. EXPERIMENTATION: Students demonstrate ability to design and conduct experiments, make measurements, analyze data, and interpret results and interactions between living systems and nonliving materials and systems.
  3. BIOENGINEERING DESIGN: Students demonstrate ability to design engineering solutions to meet needs with biological considerations and constraints of producers, users, investors and society.
  4. TEAMWORK: Students demonstrate an ability to work in teams comprised of engineers and others to produce joint work products.
  5. SYSTEMS SOLUTIONS: Students demonstrate ability to use analogous thinking, synthesis and analysis, integrative systems approaches, and associated tools to solve engineering problems.
  6. PROFESSIONAL ETHICS: Students demonstrate understanding of professional and ethical responsibility and reasoning suitable for professional decision-making.
  7. COMMUNICATION: Students demonstrate ability to communicate effectively in written and oral forms to interdisciplinary audiences.
  8. CRITICAL THINKING: Students demonstrate ability to analyze and evaluate scientific and engineering arguments or claims and to critically relate such claims to global, economic, environmental, professional, and societal issues.
  9. INDEPENDENT LEARNING: Students demonstrate awareness of a need for ongoing professional growth and ability to learn independently to address challenges they encounter.
  10. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES: Students demonstrate awareness of diverse contemporary issues that influence their career development and professional practice.
  11. PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOLOGY: Students demonstrate advanced knowledge of physiology and biology and can identify and solve problems which require the integration of that knowledge with engineering and advanced mathematical tools.

Washington State University Goals for a Baccalaureate Education

Washington State University also has set six goals for a baccalaureate education.  These are:

  1. Critical and Creative Thinking
    Graduates will use knowledge of evidence and context to reason and reach conclusions as well as to innovate in imaginative ways. Graduates will demonstrate critical and creative thinking by their ability to:

    • Apply the WSU Guide to Rating Critical Thinking to analyze problems, explore issues, and research questions.
    • Apply a Creative Thinking Rubric, such as:
      • Reframe problems, issues, and questions
      • Consider multiple perspectives from various people while not censoring their own perspective
      • Identify artificially imposed constraints
      • Draw new analogies and associations among disparate ideas or concepts
      • Generate a new preferred solution, test it, modify as needed, test, repeat.
  2. Quantitative & Symbolic Reasoning
    Graduates will analyze and communicate appropriately with mathematical and symbolic concepts. Graduates will demonstrate quantitative and symbolic reasoning by their ability to:

    • Analyze real world problems by critically evaluating the quantitative and symbolic information used to represent and draw inference from them.
    • Estimate and check answers to mathematical problems to determine reasonableness, identify alternatives, and select optimal results.
    • Use fundamental computer skills to apply quantitative and symbolic methods to solve problems.
    • Draw conclusions from computational and symbolic representations in order to check the logic and validity of statements and models.
    • Employ symbolic reasoning to appreciate, understand, represent, and use the variety of discourses underlying the search for truth and expression in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.
  3. Information Literacy
    Graduates will use a disciplined and systematic approach to accessing, evaluating, and using information. Graduates will demonstrate information literacy by their ability to:

    • Determine the extent and type of information needed.
    • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently from computer, print, and human data sources.
    • Evaluate information and its sources critically.
    • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose, such as making a decision or communicating persuasively.
    • Access and use information ethically and legally.
  4. Communication
    Graduates will write, speak, and listen to achieve intended and meaningful understanding. Graduates will demonstrate communication by their ability to:

    • Communicate in writing, speech, and presentation in order to convey meaning, significance, emotion and values in and beyond peer groups.
    • Appreciate background and interests of a group or audience and how this impacts the exchange of information.
    • Visually express ideas, propositions, and beliefs in coherent, concise, and technically correct forms effective with general and disciplinary audiences.
    • Engage effectively with diverse groups through listening and speaking one-on-one, in small groups, and in large groups.
  5. Self in Society
    Graduates will employ self-understanding and interact effectively with others of similar and diverse cultures, values, perspectives, and realities.  Graduates will demonstrate a sense of self in society by their ability to:

    • Understand their own values, goals, and perspectives in order to gain an understanding of those held by other individuals and cultures.
    • Reflect on, revise, and revisit issues of local and/or global significance from the vantage of a broad knowledge base.
    • Provide or effectively follow, as appropriate, informed leadership to achieve desired social outcomes.
    • Practice personal integrity, citizenship, and service to others shaped by a spirit of compassion.
    • Commit to life-long learning.
  6. Specialty
    Graduates will hone a specialty for the benefit of themselves, their communities, their employers, and for society at large. Graduates will demonstrate specialty expertise by their ability to:

    • Show a depth of knowledge within the chosen academic field of study that reflects an appropriate degree of specialization.
    • Show a breadth of knowledge within the chosen field based on integration of its history, core methods, techniques, vocabulary, and unsolved problems.
    • Apply the concepts of the discipline to personal, academic, service learning, professional, and/or community activities.
    • Understand how the methods and concepts of the chosen discipline relate to those of other disciplines, and possess the ability to engage in cross-disciplinary activities.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Prospective/Future Students

What is bioengineering/biomedical engineering and what career opportunities might I have as a bioengineer?

Those interested in Bioengineering may want to check out the future demand at the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES – we also have a student chapter) or the Biomedical Engineering Careers Website (created by the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering). You may also want to check out the employment and wages at the U. S. Department of Labor. Bioengineering is still a relatively new program and we are currently working on establishing company contacts. Over half of our undergraduates have continued on to several graduate and medical schools throughout the U.S.

Can I visit WSU and meet with someone to find out more about the program?

Yes! You can schedule an organized visit or a visit by appointment online. Time may be set aside to meet with faculty members of your chosen major during your visit but contact the department early to be sure the faculty member is available. You can also learn more about Bioengineering or Chemical Engineering by visiting the Career Cornerstone website.

Where is WSU?

Washington State University is located in Pullman, Washington. The region is called “The Palouse”. You can find more information about the area on our Pullman Community page which lists a few interesting facts about Pullman and has a couple of useful links. You can also find some interesting facts at Why WSU?

What kind of additional programs are available?

There are several programs and opportunities for students available at WSU including Honors College, Education Abroad, and ROTC to name a few. You can contact your department to find out more programs specific to your interests.

What student clubs are available?

There are numerous clubs and societies available at WSU. Many are for engineering students and can be found at the College of Engineering and Architecture website on the Student Clubs page.

Where is the Academic Success and Career Center (formerly CACD)?

The Academic Success and Career Center is located in Lighty Rm 180. You can also contact them via phone at 509-335–6000.

What is the Academic Success and Career Center?

Academic Services has joined up with Career Services to provide better services to students. For more information, go to their website at the Academic Success and Career Center.

Where is the Registrar’s Office?

The Registrar’s Office is located in French Ad Rm 346. You can also contact them via phone at 509-335–5346.

Where is the Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering Office (ChEBE)?

Our office is located in Wegner Hall Rm 105. You can also contact us via phone at 509-335–4332.

How do I apply for a scholarship?

Scholarships are available through the College of Engineering and Architecture. Scholarship awards are based on your GPA.

Will my credits transfer?

If you are a transfer student, your transfer work will be evaluated by the Admissions Office and applied to your Degree Audit Report (DARs). The Admissions Office evaluates only General Education Requirements (GERs). Your department will evaluate any courses that may fulfill departmental requirements. Also, you may be able to review your Transfer Course Equivalencies by visiting the Transfer Center website. In addition, please visit the Voiland College’s Transfer Information page.

What kind of a computer/laptop do I need?

Questions About Courses/Research Opportunities

Bioengineering Curriculum Flow/Courses

Please check out our Bioengineering Curriculum Flow Diagram for more information on the sequence of courses suggested for bioengineering.

What are the courses like?

Engineering is the only professional occupation that starts at the bachelor level, therefore, our courses reflect the level of information required of a professional engineer.

What courses should I take for Advanced Placement?

You can check the Advanced Placement Credit page to view which exams will transfer into WSU. Please note that if you take Physics that there is no lab credit and you would still be required to take Physics while attending WSU. The most popular AP courses are Calculus, Chemistry, Biology, and Physics.

What courses should I take for Running Start?

You can check the Transfer Credit Equivalencies to view exactly which course or combination of courses will transfer into WSU. You can select either a single course or a set of courses (recommended). The most popular courses are Calculus, Chemistry, Biology, and Physics.

Admissions/Transfers

What is the Academic Success and Career Center (formerly CACD)?

The Academic Success and Career Center is a valuable resource to students regarding their academic path. The Academic Success and Career Center also offers Summer Alive! sessions which introduce new students to University life.

Are there research opportunities available for undergraduates?

Yes! You can contact any of your professors or the department in which you are interested in working.

Questions from Parents

How much will it cost?

Tuition rates vary on several factors. You can get a complete estimation at Tuition & Fees.

What types of Financial Aid are available?

Financial Aid information can be found at Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarship Services.

What Scholarships are available?

Scholarship information can be found at Scholarship and Finances. There are additional scholarships offered by the College of Engineering and Architecture—Scholarships.

Where do students live?

There are several residence halls that students can live in. The resident hall that is recommended most often for engineering students is Stephenson Complex. Students with similar interests in majors are placed together to better support each other. More information can be found at Housing Services.

Is tutoring available?

Tutoring is offered throughout WSU including the Academic Success and Career Center, the College of Engineering and Architecture, and within several departments that offer the subject course.

What other resources are available?

Campus Resources can be found at Student Support Services Program (SSSP), through the College of Engineering and Architecture, or through the department.

Current Students

Where is the ChEBE office?

We are located in Wegner Hall 105. Phone: 509-335-4332.

Where is the Registrar’s Office?

The Registrar’s Office is located in French Ad. 346.
Phone: 509-335-5346.

What is the deadline for ???

Check out the Academic Calendar for important deadlines.

Where do I go for the Writing Portfolio?

The writing portfolio program is located in Smith CUE 305.
Phone: 509-335-7959
Email: juniorportfolio@wsu.edu

Why do I have a Writing Portfolio Hold?

A writing portfolio hold is placed on all students after you have completed 60 semester hours. You can find out more information at the Writing Program page.

Is tutoring available?

Tutoring is offered throughout WSU including the Academic Success and Career Center, the College of Engineering and Architecture, and within several departments that offer the subject course.

What resources are available?

Campus Resources can be found at Student Support Services Program (SSSP), through the College of Engineering and Architecture, or through the department—Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, PO Box 646515, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-6515.

Who is my advisor?

Most students receive information and advisor assignment during the summer either through Summer Alive! or via regular mail. If you have forgotten who you advisor is, you can contact the Academic Success and Career Center.

Can I change my advisor?

Yes. You can request a new advisor by contacting the Academic Success and Career Center.

What student clubs can I join?

You can check out a listing of all the student clubs available within the College of Engineering and Architecture.

Can I change my major?

Yes. You can change your major interest at any time before you are certified by contacting the Academic Success and Career Center. They will reassign you to an advisor in your new area of interest.

Can I certify a second major or minor?

Yes. You will need to fill out a “Petition for Certifying a Second Major or Minor” card available from the Registrar’s Office or you can print it out from the RONet Website and return the completed form to the Registrar’s Office.

Can I change my major even though I have certified?

Yes. You will need to fill out a “Change of Major Form” available from the Registrar’s Office or you can print it out from the RONet Website and return the completed form to the Registrar’s Office.

Are there Internship opportunities available for undergraduates?

Yes! You can contact the department that you are interested in working in. There are also fliers posted throughout the College of Engineering and Architecture & also on the department doors when an internship opportunity becomes available. For more information about internships go to the Professional Practice and Experiential Learning (PPEL) Program’s web page.

Are there Education Abroad opportunities available for undergraduates?

Yes! You can contact the Education Abroad office in International Programs. There are also fliers posted throughout the College of Engineering and Architecture & also on the department doors when an Education Abroad opportunity becomes available. More information can be found at WSU Education Abroad Options in Engineering.

When can I apply for Graduation?

You can apply for graduation after you have completed 70 semester hours and be certified into your major.

How do I apply for Graduation?

You will need to fill out a “Undergraduate and Professional Degree Application” available from the Registrar’s Office or from your department. Follow ALL of the instructions on the back of the application card and return the completed card to the Registrar’s Office.

Students working in Dr. Wen-ji Dong's lab